IS INDIA STILL UNDER ROYAL RULE? - watsupptoday.com
IS INDIA STILL UNDER ROYAL RULE?
Posted 15 Sep 2017 05:31 PM

Even after 71 years of independence, India is not free from the Britisher’s as it is still not self-sustained and always need a poking element to revive itself. There are still plenty of rules and regulations which are inherited by the Britishers and Indians are following it. Few of them are as under:
• Khakee Uniform: Sir Harry Bernet is found to be behind the idea of introducing a Khakee color of dressing which is still prevalent since 1847.
• Left Handed Traffic Arrangement
• Salt Cess Act 1953
• Indian Police Act 1863
• Indian Evidence Act 1872
• Indian Penal Code
There are many other acts which are still been implemented in the country. In 1997 when Queen Elizabeth II visited India with plans of going to the Jallianwala Bagh in Amritsar. People even protested and demanded an apology for the massacre of hundreds of Indians by the British Troops. But the Queen overlooked this demand and successfully completed her visit and then she headed to the capital of the country for her stay. She was so disgusted with the mess in Delhi that she said “Delhi is a dirty city.
The statement by the Queen was so humiliating that Prime Minister Inder Gujral that he was pushed to take instant action for cleansing the city. Delhi has the shameful distinction of being the fourth most polluted city in the world, with the state transport minister Rajendra Gupta having admitted to 7,500 deaths in 1996 due to pollution-related diseases. Add to that the heaps of filth that lie strewn all over the perpetually dug-up Delhi roads—part of the 5,000 tonnes of garbage generated daily in the city, with 40%of it was uncleared. There's more. Lots more in those squalid Delhi slums which saw an ugly rise in population from 18 lakh in 1981 to 32 lakh in 1991 and raring to add up a most shockingly huge number in 2001. As for that hideous sight of people relieving themselves out in the open in our historic city, well they can hardly help it. The last count had no more than 400 stomach-churningly dirty public urinals for a population of much over 10 million. There were plenty of press releases stating the plight of the instant Clean Delhi Drive. Although the PM refused to admit that the cleanliness drive was taken out after the Queen’s alarming comment.
This was one of the incidents when Britishers made India aware of the prevailing situations going on in its land.
Another such incident was that of the BlueStar operation when the Indian army went to remove Khalistani militant Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale. The whole plan and plot were set in the UK under the supervision of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher had sent an officer from the elite SAS or special air service to advise the government of India on the raid.
They suggested using helicopter-borne forces to ensure minimal casualties for "a swift resolution". However, investigations reveal India didn't have helicopter capability.

Operation Blue Star had two components. The first was Operation Metal, which was confined to the Golden Temple complex.

Operation Metal was followed by Operation Shop, wherein security forces raided Punjab's countryside in order to capture suspects.

The second component was Operation Woodrose, launched throughout Punjab to quell militancy. General Arunkumar Shridhar Vaidya, who was the brain behind Operation Bluestar involving military attack against the militants of Khalistan movement.
According to Lieutenant General Kuldip Singh Brar, who commanded the operation, the body of Bhindranwale was identified by a number of agencies, including the police, the Intelligence Bureau, and militants in the Army's custody. Bhindranwale was injured on the right side of his temple. He was caught alive and was tortured to death; this claim was done by Bhindranwale's son.
There are innumerable incidents that prove that we are still under surveillance of Britishers. When will India stand for itself without a third party help? Hope soon we will be counted in the list of developed countries one day.

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